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Jeong Hyug Ahn 1 Article
Change of Otoacoustic Emissions in Early Stage of Meniere's Disease
Jeong Hyug Ahn, Eui Kyung Goh, Se Joon Oh, Soo Keun Kong, Il Woo Lee, Kyong Myong Chon
J Korean Bal Soc. 2006;5(1):15-20.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
and Objectives: To determine the clinical application of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in screening of cochlear function, author studied changes of OAE in Meniere's disease patients. Materials and Methods: The author has measured several parameters of OAE with 34 meniere's patients and 15 normal persons. Pass rate, response amplitude, reproducibility were recorded at TEOAE. Amplitude of DP-gram were measured at 2 F2 frequencies - 1000, 2000 Hz. The input/output functions of DPOAE were recorded at 2 F2 frequencies - 1001, 2002 Hz (respectively DP-1000, DP-2000). Input/output function were determined based on 2 parameters -maximal level and Detection threshold of DPOAE.
Results
1) TEOAE: Significant lower rate of positive finding was recorded at involved ears (55.8%, 19/34) than normal ears (100%, 30/30). 2) DP-gram: At frequency was 2000 Hz, amplitude of involved ears (n=28, 6.3±8.5dB/SPL) was significant smaller than normal ears (n=30, 6.3±8.5 dB/SPL). 3) DP-input/output function: At maximum DP level of DP-2000, response of involved ears (n=11, 51.6±7.9 dB/SPL) was significant larger than normal ears (n=22, 48.5±7.0 dB/SPL).
Conclusion
Parameters of OAE, such as pass rate of TEOAE, amplitude of DP-gram at 2000 Hz, and maximum DP level of DP-2000 was considered to good indicators for monitoring cochlear function of Meniere's disease. Furthermore, evaluation by changes in the TEOAE & DPOAE combined parameters, appeared to be very useful for detection of subtle change in cochlear function of Meniere's disease. Key Words : Otoacoustic emissions, Meniere's disease

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science