Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Issue > Previous issues
6 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Volume 13 (3); September 2014
Prev issue Next issue
Review
Balance Problem after Cochlear Implantation
Eui Kyung Goh
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):63-67.
  • 2,005 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cochlear implantations are very popularly performed for hearing rehabilitation of profound hearing loss recently. Postoperative dizziness is one of common complications of cochlear implantation, and one-third of recipients complaint of experience a dizziness after cochlear implantation. The patients should be informed about postimplantation vertigo symptoms. Aims of this article are to provide the basis for preoperative counseling, decrease of postoperative dizziness and postoperative vestibular therapy to cochlear implant recipients with literature review.
Case Reports
A Case of Cerebellar Arteriovenous Malformation with Positional Down Beat Nystagmus
Kong Geun Bae, Jeong Yeop Lee, Bo Gyung Kim, Jong Dae Lee
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):68-71.
  • 1,923 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an abnormal connection between arteries and veins, bypassing the capillary system in the central nervous system. The first symptom of AVM is intracranial hemorrhage, followed by headache and seizure. However, dizziness as a symptom of AVM is very rare. We report a 16-year-old female patient who presented with disequilibrium. She showed down-beating nystamgus on Dix-Hallpike test and falling tendency on Romberg test with eyes open. Magnetic resonance image showed cerebellar AVM.
Profound Hearing Loss after Endolymphatic Sac Decompression in Intractable Meniere’s Disease
Pona Park, Kyung Tae Park, Hyun Seok Choi, Ja Won Koo
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):72-76.
  • 1,961 View
  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Endolymphatic sac decompression (ESD) is indicated in intractable Meniere’s disease patients with serviceable hearing. A 43-year-old man presented with recurrent vertigo and fluctuating right hearing loss that had been intractable to medical treatment. ESD was performed for the purpose of vertigo control with hearing preservation. Positional vertigo with profound hearing loss developed immediate after surgery and positional vertigo was resolved within days. Following paralytic vestibulopathy with positive sign on head thrust test also resolved after 2 weeks, while sensorineural hearing loss was not recovered to preoperative level during 1 year of follow up. Recurrent vertigo attacks were developed again 1 year after the operation. Hearing preservation was not always guaranteed in ESD. Furthermore, chance of hearing loss should be included in informed consent though the procedure is purposed for hearing preservation.
Bilateral Vestibulopathy with Alcohol Abuse and Vitamin Deficiency
Sangheon Park, Jiwon Chang
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):77-80.
  • 2,240 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) is a clinical entity with impaired function of bilateral peripheral vestibular system, which is characterized by movement-induced vertigo, oscillopsia and gait unsteadiness. Among various etiologies of BV, alcohol and vitamin B deficiency has rarely been reported. We experienced a case of BV with vitamin B deficiency in a 24-year-old man who was previously exposed to alcohol. He had osillopsia and gait unsteadiness as a primary symptom, and was treated successfully with vestibular rehabilitation and vitamin supplement. Bithermal caloric test, rotatory chair test and head impulse test showed the result compatible with BV.
Acute Vestibular Neuritis Associated with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus
Yoon Chang Oh, Jong Kyung Lee, Jae Myung Kim, Seung Han Lee
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):81-84.
  • 5,757 View
  • 99 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Vestibular neuritis, one of common causes of acute spontaneous vertigo, is characterized by a sudden onset of vertigo with horizontal-torsional spontaneous nystagmus and unsteadiness with a falling tendency. Herpes zoster is a common infection caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) occurs when this virus is reactivated in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. VZV can cause vestibular neuritis with cochlear dysfunction as a form of herpes zoster oticus, also known as Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. However, to our knowledge, isolated vestibular neuritis associated with HZO has been rarely reported, because of distance between the trigeminal nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve. We present an unusual case of vestibular neuritis complicated by the HZO.
Multiple Cerebral Infarction in Cogan’s Syndrome
Jae Deuk Seo, Jae Hwan Choi, Kwang Dong Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(3):85-88.
  • 1,802 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cogan’s syndrome is a rare chronic inflammatory disease Characterized by non-syphilitic keratitis and vestibuloauditory dysfunction. Although the precise pathogenesis of Cogan’s syndrome is unknown, it is thought to develop from vasculitis involving multiple organ system. It can be accompanied with various systemic diseases including arthritis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and aortitis with insufficiency. We report a case of typical Cogan’s syndrome with multiple cerebral infarctions.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science