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12 "Seok Min Hong"
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Original Articles
Prevalence and preferred medication for vestibular migraine in Menière’s disease: a multicenter retrospective cohort study in Korea
Dong-Han Lee, Hong Ju Park, Kyu-Sung Kim, Hyun Ji Kim, Jae-Yong Byun, Min-Beom Kim, Minbum Kim, Myung-Whan Suh, Jae-Hyun Seo, Jong Dae Lee, Eun-Ju Jeon, Myung Hoon Yoo, Seok Min Hong, Sung-Kwang Hong, Hyo-Jeong Lee, Jung Woo Lee, Se-Joon Oh, Hyun Ah Kim, Hyung Lee, Eek-Sung Lee, Eun-Jin Kwon, Seong-Hae Jeong, Jeong-Yoon Choi, Chang-Hee Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2024;23(2):37-45.   Published online June 14, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2024.005
  • 311 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study is to categorize headaches associated with definite Menière’s disease (MD) according to diagnostic criteria, to determine their prevalence, and to investigate the preferred medication across participating centers.
Methods
Patients diagnosed with definite MD at 17 university hospitals in otolaryngology or neurology departments in Korea between January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2021 were retrospectively included. Data on the presence of accompanying vestibular migraine (VM), migraine or non-migraine headaches, and clinical information were collected. A survey was conducted to assess preferences for treatment drugs for vertigo and headache control in MD patients with headache.
Results
A total of 435 definite MD patients were included, with a mean age of 57.0±14.9 years. Among them, 135 (31.0%) had accompanying headaches, of whom 48 (11.0% of all definite MD patients) could be diagnosed with VM. The prevalence of comorbid VM (definite and probable) was significantly higher in females (41 of 288, 14.2%) than in males (7 of 147, 4.8%) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of comorbid VM between unilateral and bilateral MD patients (10.8% and 13.6%, respectively) (p > 0.05). Benzodiazepines, antihistamines, and antiemetics were mainly preferred for acute vertigo control, while nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and triptans were preferred for acute headache control, and topiramate, propranolol, and calcium channel blockers were mainly preferred for headache prevention.
Conclusions
VM is not uncommon in patients with definite MD in Korea. Further research is needed to understand the differences in headache prevalence and preferred medications across different centers.
Clinical Characteristics of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Accompanying Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Sung Min Park, Bin Kwon, Sung Won Li, Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2020;19(2):71-78.   Published online June 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2020.19.2.71
  • 5,281 View
  • 120 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Idiopathic unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with simultaneous benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) is known to be associated with poor hearing recovery. We aimed to investigate clinical findings in patients with SSNHL with BPPV and analyze prognostic factors including presence of BPPV related to hearing outcome.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical data of 14 patients with concurrent SSNHL and BPPV (combined group). We selected 52 patients without BPPV as a control group who have matched initial threshold of pure tone audiometry and age of each patient in the combined group. We evaluated clinical characteristics of all participants and compared hearing outcomes between the 2 groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the factors related to hearing recovery.
Results
Initial mean pure tone audiometry (PTA) threshold of combined group was 90.36±26.2 dB. Posterior canal was most commonly involved (n=7, 50%), and 8 (57%) patients showed abnormal video head impulse test results. There was no significant difference between hearing recovery rates of combined and control group (p=0.237) and mean pure tone audiometry threshold changes were not significantly different between the 2 groups (p=0.942). Old age (≥60 years), high initial PTA threshold (>90 dB), and obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2) were poor prognostic predictors.
Conclusions
There was no difference between hearing outcomes of combined group and profound SSNHL only group. BPPV was not a significant prognostic factor of SSNHL patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Which Is More Important for the Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Vertigo, Canal Paresis or Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?
    Yong-Hwi An, Hyun Joon Shim
    Research in Vestibular Science.2021; 20(3): 101.     CrossRef
Review
Vestibular Rehabilitation after Traumatic Head Injury with Dizziness
Sung Kyun Kim, Seok Min Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(2):32-37.   Published online June 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.2.32
  • 4,772 View
  • 153 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The vestibular symptoms such as dizziness and imbalance that occurred after traumatic head/brain injury were caused by a combination of central factors such as abnormalities of white matter, diffuse axonal injury and microhemorrhage, and peripheral factors like decreased vestibulo-ocular reflex caused by the energy transmitted to the semicircular canal and otolith organs. These symptoms can affect on the patient's overall physical, cognitive, emotional, and quality of life. There have been reports that vestibular rehabilitation for the treatment of dizziness and imbalance after head trauma can promote vestibular compensation, stabilize of the gaze movements, and also affect the treatment outcomes of the associated injuries. The frequency, duration, and number of people participating in vestibular rehabilitation varied with each study, and physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive counseling, medication treatment, duration of treatment for associated injuries were also variable. Most studies have shown that many patients who get the vestibular rehabilitation have a significantly reduced time to return to work and sports activities, and may be able to speed up the recovery of vestibular symptoms. However, further research is needed on its long-term effects. In addition, patients with traumatic head/brain injuries are more susceptible to injuries of other organs as well as vestibular disorders, therefore consideration of treatment planning for associated injuries including precise evaluation mental support, and cognitive therapy is expected to be more effective with vestibular rehabilitation therapy.
2
Vestibular rehabilitation after traumatic head injury with dizziness
Sung Kyun Kim, Seok Min Hong
Received May 7, 2019  Accepted June 1, 2019  Published online June 1, 2019  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,046 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
The vestibular symptoms such as dizziness and imbalance that occurred after traumatic head/brain injury were caused by a combination of central factors such as abnormalities of white matter, diffuse axonal injury and micro-hemorrhage, and peripheral factors like decreased vestibulo-ocular reflex caused by the energy transmitted to the semicircular canal and otolith organs. These symptoms can affect on the patient's overall physical, cognitive, emotional, and quality of life. There have been reports that vestibular rehabilitation for the treatment of dizziness and imbalance after head trauma can promote vestibular compensation, stabilize of the gaze movements, and also affect the treatment outcomes of the associated injuries. The frequency, duration, and number of people participating in vestibular rehabilitation varied with each study, and physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive counseling, medication treatment, duration of treatment for associated injuries were also variable. Most studies have shown that many patients who get the vestibular rehabilitation have a significantly reduced time to return to work and sports activities, and may be able to speed up the recovery of vestibular symptoms. However, further research is needed on its long-term effects. In addition, patients with traumatic head/brain injuries are more susceptible to injuries of other organs as well as vestibular disorders, therefore consideration of treatment planning for associated injuries including precise evaluation mental support, and cognitive therapy is expected to be more effective with vestibular rehabilitation therapy.
Original Articles
Outcome of Canalith Repositioning Procedure in Patients with Persistent and Transient Geotropic Direction-Changing Positional Nystagmus: Short-term Follow-up Evaluation
Seung Sik Jeon, Sung Won Li, Sung Kyun Kim, Yong Bok Kim, Il-Seok Park, Seok Min Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(3):109-115.   Published online September 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.3.109
  • 5,466 View
  • 99 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Patients, who showed persistent geotropic-direction changing positional nystagmus (p-DCPN) tend to have different clinical manifestations from those who showed transient geotropic DCPN (t-DCPN). We investigated the clinical characteristics between p-DCPN and t-DCPN patients, and its recovery rate after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP).
Methods
Based on the duration of nystagmus, 117 geotropic DCPN patients were classified to 2 groups, p-DCPN and t-DCPN. Barbeque maneuver had been introduced towards the opposite direction of null plane for the p-DCPN patients, and to the opposite direction of stronger nystagmus for the t-DCPN patients.
Results
Seventy-four patients showed t-DCPN and 43 patients were classified to the p-DCPN cases. No p-DCPN patient showed prompt improvement after the 1st canalolith reposition therapy. Among the t-DCPN patients, 18 canal switch cases were found , but, there was no canal switch cases found among the p-DCPN The CRP has showed less effective for the p-DCPN patients than the t-DCPN patients (after the 1st CRP, 37 in 74 improved, p<0.001).
Conclusions
Due to its distinguishing clinical manifestation, p-DCPN may have different pathogenesis and clinical mechanisms from t-DCPN. And for the p-DCPN patients, the CRP seems not an efficient treatment compared to the t-DCPN patients. Further study with larger number of enrolled subjects is necessary.
Dizzy and Psychological Scales in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Suspicious Patients without Characteristic Nystagmus
Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim, Heejin Kim, Seok Jin Hong, Yong Bok Kim, Il-Seok Park, Dawoon Oh
Res Vestib Sci. 2017;16(3):80-84.   Published online September 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2017.16.3.80
  • 9,710 View
  • 143 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Patients, who have had a history of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)-like symptoms, but no characteristic nystagmus, were often present. They are diagnosed as having a resolved state from BPPV or normal, and tend to be overlooked. We investigated the dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, which they had vertigo of a short duration at the specific head position, and clinically suspicious BPPV, but no nystagmus in positional tests, were enrolled. We compared dizzy and psychological scales of suspicious BPPV patients with 138 BPPV patients, using dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), the beck depression inventory (BDI), and the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory. Additionally, among the BPPV-suspicious group, patients with a BPPV history were compared with those with no previous BPPV. Results: No differences in the all scales were found between the two groups. However, DHI scores of patients with a previous BPPV attack were significantly higher than those of patients with no BPPV-like symptoms; in particular, there was a significant difference in emotional scores. Conclusion: Although the patients had no characteristic nystagmus, if they have a BPPV-like history and symptoms, emotional support and periodic follow up are needed. In particular, careful observation should be performed in patients with previous BPPV attack.
1
Dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients without characteristic nystagmus
Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim, Heejin Kim, Seok Jin Hong, Yong Bok Kim, Il-seok Park, Dawoon Oh
Received July 29, 2017  Accepted August 19, 2017  Published online August 19, 2017  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,527 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
Objectives
Patients, who have had a history of BPPV-like symptoms, but no characteristic nystagmus, were often present. They are diagnosed as having a resolved state from BPPV or normal, and tend to be overlooked. We investigated the dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients. Study Design : prospective study
Methods
Thirty-nine patients, which they had vertigo of a short duration at the specific head position, and clinically suspicious BPPV, but no nystagmus in positional tests, were enrolled. We compared dizzy and psychological scales of suspicious BPPV patients with 138 BPPV patients, using DHI, BDI and STAI. Additionally, among the BPPV-suspicious group, patients with a BPPV history were compared with those with no previous BPPV.
Results
No differences in the all scales were found between the two groups. However, DHI scores of patients with a previous BPPV attack were significantly higher than those of patients with no BPPV-like symptoms; in particular, there was a significant difference in emotional scores.
Conclusion
Although the patients had no characteristic nystagmus, if they have a BPPV-like history and symptoms, emotional support and periodic follow up are needed. In particular, careful observation should be performed in patients with previous BPPV attack.
Case Reports
Tumarkin Otolithic Crisis Controlled by Endolymphatic Sac Surgery
Seok Min Hong, Il Seok Park, Jae Ho Ban
Res Vestib Sci. 2015;14(1):32-35.
  • 2,311 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Turmarkin otolithic crisis is a rare feature of Meniere’s disease. It shows sudden falling to the ground with no warning sign. It is an otologic emergency because of the risk of falling, and it has traditionally been treated with labyrinthectomy or vestibular neurectomy. We experienced a 49-year-old male suffering from recurrent drop attack, and found that he had hearing loss, tinnitus or recurrent vertigo on his left ear, and could make a diagnosis him as Tumarkin otolithic crisis. We have performed the endolymphatic sac decompression, considering the hearing preservation and therapeutic opinion of patients. Two years after surgery, he showed intermittent, mild dizzy symptoms, without further drop attack. Therefore, we report our clinical experience with a brief review of literature.
Vestibular Paroxysmia in a 7-Year-Old Child
Seok Min Hong, Sung Ho Choi, Il Seok Park, Yong Bok Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2014;13(1):19-23.
  • 1,950 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Neurovascular cross-compression of the eighth cranial nerve is characterized by brief attacks of vertigo, unilateral audiologic symptoms such as tinnitus, ear fullness and hearing disturbance and relatively rare disease, in particular, in children. We report a 7-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent spontaneous vertigo, lasting 15 seconds and occuring up to 40 times per day and often associated with physical activity. Her symptoms were developed by hyperventilation. Associated aural symptoms are not founded. Magnetic resonance image showed the eighth cranial nerve compression caused by the vascular loop. She was treated with oxcarbazepine and showed improving symptoms. Therefore we report our clinical experience with a brief review of literature.
Original Article
Multicenter Study on the Clinician’s Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Korea
Eun Ju Jeon, Won Ho Chung, Jeong Hwan Choi, Eui Cheol Nam, Hong Ju Park, Jong Dae Lee, Won Sang Lee, Kyu Sung Kim, Eui Kyung Goh, Ja Won Koo, Min Bum Kim, Min Beom Kim, Se Hyung Kim, Young Jin Kim, Chang Hee Kim, Sung Il Nam, Seog Kyun Mun, Ga Young Park, Sang Yoo Park, Shi Nae Park, Chang Hoon Bae, Sung Hyun Boo, Myung Whan Suh, Jae Hyun Seo, Eun Jin Son, Jae Jun Song, Jae Jin Song, Joong Wook Shin, Dae Bo Shim, Seong Ki Ahn, Hye Youn Youm, Shin Young Yoo, Dong Hee Lee, Seung Hwan Lee, Chang Ho Lee, Hyun Seok Lee, Hwan Ho Lee, Hyo Jeong Lee, Yun Hoon Choung, Seung Hyo Choi, Jee Sun Choi, Seok Min Hong, Sung Kwang Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(3):79-92.
  • 2,273 View
  • 65 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: It is necessary to establish the most efficient diagnostic and therapeutic method for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which is appropriate for Korean healthcare system. We aimed to evaluate current state of Korean clinician’s diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for BPPV. Materials and Methods: A 16-item survey was emailed to the members of dizziness department of Otology Research Interest Group in the Korean Otologic Society (n=68). 43 were returned and analyzed. Results: All respondents (100%) used Dix-Hallpike test as a diagnostic tool for vertical canal-BPPV. Supine roll test was used for diagnosing lateral canal BPPV in nearly all the respondents (97.7%). Epley maneuver was chosen as otolith repositioning maneuver (ORM) for posterior canal BPPV in all respondents and barbecue rotation (BBQ) was used for treating lateral canal BPPV with geotropic nystagmus in 95.3% of respondents. Extreme variation was noted for therapeutic approach of lateral canal BPPV with ageotropic nystagmus BBQ, with 4 kinds of ORM and adjunctive measures to liberate otolith from cupula, while BBQ was again the most commonly used ORM (76.7%). Conclusion: The development of practical and efficient ORM for lateral canal BPPV with ageotropic nystagmus is necessary.
Case Report
A Case of Facial Palsy Developed after Vestibular Neuritis Involving Superior Vestibular Nerve
Young Gil Ko, Seok Min Hong, Chan Hum Park, Jun Ho Lee
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):34-37.
  • 2,590 View
  • 73 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Vestibular neuritis is generally thought to be caused by a viral or postviral inflammatory disorder of vestibular structures. But there is no definite evidence to explain this pathophysiological mechanism until now. We experienced an unusual case of 34-year-old man who presented with facial paralysis several days after vertigo of a whirling nature. We report a case of facial palsy developed in succession of ipsilateral vestibular neuritis involving superior vestibular nerve which may infer the viral pathophysiology for the vestibular neuritis with a brief literature review.
Original Article
Expression of Glutamate Receptors in the Medial Vestibular Nuclei following Acute Hypotension
Jae Hee Lee, Myoung Ae Choi, Dong Ok Choi, Bo Kyoung Kim, Seok Min Hong, Byung Rim Park
J Korean Bal Soc. 2007;6(1):29-35.
  • 1,625 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute hypotension induced excitation of electrical activities and expression of c-Fos protein and pERK in the vestibular nuclei. In this study, to investigate the excitatory signaling pathway in the vestibular nuclei following acute hypotension, expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of glutamate NMDA receptor and GluR1 subunit of glutamate AMPA receptor was determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting in the medial vestibular nucleus 30 min after acute hypotension in rats. Acute hypotension increased expression of NR2A, NR2B, and pGluR1 in the medial vestibular nuclei. These results suggest that both of NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors take part in transmission of excitatory afferent signals following acute hypotension.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science