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10 "Sung Kyun Kim"
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Original Article
Clinical Characteristics of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Accompanying Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Sung Min Park, Bin Kwon, Sung Won Li, Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2020;19(2):71-78.   Published online June 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2020.19.2.71
  • 5,281 View
  • 120 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Idiopathic unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with simultaneous benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) is known to be associated with poor hearing recovery. We aimed to investigate clinical findings in patients with SSNHL with BPPV and analyze prognostic factors including presence of BPPV related to hearing outcome.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical data of 14 patients with concurrent SSNHL and BPPV (combined group). We selected 52 patients without BPPV as a control group who have matched initial threshold of pure tone audiometry and age of each patient in the combined group. We evaluated clinical characteristics of all participants and compared hearing outcomes between the 2 groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the factors related to hearing recovery.
Results
Initial mean pure tone audiometry (PTA) threshold of combined group was 90.36±26.2 dB. Posterior canal was most commonly involved (n=7, 50%), and 8 (57%) patients showed abnormal video head impulse test results. There was no significant difference between hearing recovery rates of combined and control group (p=0.237) and mean pure tone audiometry threshold changes were not significantly different between the 2 groups (p=0.942). Old age (≥60 years), high initial PTA threshold (>90 dB), and obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2) were poor prognostic predictors.
Conclusions
There was no difference between hearing outcomes of combined group and profound SSNHL only group. BPPV was not a significant prognostic factor of SSNHL patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Which Is More Important for the Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Vertigo, Canal Paresis or Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?
    Yong-Hwi An, Hyun Joon Shim
    Research in Vestibular Science.2021; 20(3): 101.     CrossRef
Review
Vestibular Rehabilitation after Traumatic Head Injury with Dizziness
Sung Kyun Kim, Seok Min Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(2):32-37.   Published online June 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.2.32
  • 4,772 View
  • 153 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The vestibular symptoms such as dizziness and imbalance that occurred after traumatic head/brain injury were caused by a combination of central factors such as abnormalities of white matter, diffuse axonal injury and microhemorrhage, and peripheral factors like decreased vestibulo-ocular reflex caused by the energy transmitted to the semicircular canal and otolith organs. These symptoms can affect on the patient's overall physical, cognitive, emotional, and quality of life. There have been reports that vestibular rehabilitation for the treatment of dizziness and imbalance after head trauma can promote vestibular compensation, stabilize of the gaze movements, and also affect the treatment outcomes of the associated injuries. The frequency, duration, and number of people participating in vestibular rehabilitation varied with each study, and physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive counseling, medication treatment, duration of treatment for associated injuries were also variable. Most studies have shown that many patients who get the vestibular rehabilitation have a significantly reduced time to return to work and sports activities, and may be able to speed up the recovery of vestibular symptoms. However, further research is needed on its long-term effects. In addition, patients with traumatic head/brain injuries are more susceptible to injuries of other organs as well as vestibular disorders, therefore consideration of treatment planning for associated injuries including precise evaluation mental support, and cognitive therapy is expected to be more effective with vestibular rehabilitation therapy.
2
Vestibular rehabilitation after traumatic head injury with dizziness
Sung Kyun Kim, Seok Min Hong
Received May 7, 2019  Accepted June 1, 2019  Published online June 1, 2019  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,046 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
The vestibular symptoms such as dizziness and imbalance that occurred after traumatic head/brain injury were caused by a combination of central factors such as abnormalities of white matter, diffuse axonal injury and micro-hemorrhage, and peripheral factors like decreased vestibulo-ocular reflex caused by the energy transmitted to the semicircular canal and otolith organs. These symptoms can affect on the patient's overall physical, cognitive, emotional, and quality of life. There have been reports that vestibular rehabilitation for the treatment of dizziness and imbalance after head trauma can promote vestibular compensation, stabilize of the gaze movements, and also affect the treatment outcomes of the associated injuries. The frequency, duration, and number of people participating in vestibular rehabilitation varied with each study, and physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive counseling, medication treatment, duration of treatment for associated injuries were also variable. Most studies have shown that many patients who get the vestibular rehabilitation have a significantly reduced time to return to work and sports activities, and may be able to speed up the recovery of vestibular symptoms. However, further research is needed on its long-term effects. In addition, patients with traumatic head/brain injuries are more susceptible to injuries of other organs as well as vestibular disorders, therefore consideration of treatment planning for associated injuries including precise evaluation mental support, and cognitive therapy is expected to be more effective with vestibular rehabilitation therapy.
Original Article
Outcome of Canalith Repositioning Procedure in Patients with Persistent and Transient Geotropic Direction-Changing Positional Nystagmus: Short-term Follow-up Evaluation
Seung Sik Jeon, Sung Won Li, Sung Kyun Kim, Yong Bok Kim, Il-Seok Park, Seok Min Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(3):109-115.   Published online September 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.3.109
  • 5,466 View
  • 99 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Patients, who showed persistent geotropic-direction changing positional nystagmus (p-DCPN) tend to have different clinical manifestations from those who showed transient geotropic DCPN (t-DCPN). We investigated the clinical characteristics between p-DCPN and t-DCPN patients, and its recovery rate after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP).
Methods
Based on the duration of nystagmus, 117 geotropic DCPN patients were classified to 2 groups, p-DCPN and t-DCPN. Barbeque maneuver had been introduced towards the opposite direction of null plane for the p-DCPN patients, and to the opposite direction of stronger nystagmus for the t-DCPN patients.
Results
Seventy-four patients showed t-DCPN and 43 patients were classified to the p-DCPN cases. No p-DCPN patient showed prompt improvement after the 1st canalolith reposition therapy. Among the t-DCPN patients, 18 canal switch cases were found , but, there was no canal switch cases found among the p-DCPN The CRP has showed less effective for the p-DCPN patients than the t-DCPN patients (after the 1st CRP, 37 in 74 improved, p<0.001).
Conclusions
Due to its distinguishing clinical manifestation, p-DCPN may have different pathogenesis and clinical mechanisms from t-DCPN. And for the p-DCPN patients, the CRP seems not an efficient treatment compared to the t-DCPN patients. Further study with larger number of enrolled subjects is necessary.
1
Outcome of canalith repositioning procedure in patients with persistent and transient geotropic direction-changing positional nystagmus : Short term follow-up evaluation
Seung Sik Jeon, Seok Min Hong, Yong Bok Kim, Sung Kyun Kim, Il-Seok Park
Received July 19, 2018  Accepted August 31, 2018  Published online August 31, 2018  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,194 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract
Objectives
Patients, who showed persistent geotropic-direction changing positional nystagmus(p-DCPN) tend to have different clinical manifestations from those who showed transient persistent geotropic DCPN(t-DCPN). We investigated the clinical characteristics between p-DCPN and t-DCPN patients, and its recovery rate after canalith repositioning procedure(CRP).
Methods
Based on the duration of nystagmus, 117 geotropic DCPN patients were classified to two groups, p-DCPN and t-DCPN. Barbeque maneuver had been introduced towards the direction of null plane for the p-DCPN patients, and to the direction of stronger nystagmus for the t-DCPN patients.
Results
74 patients showed t-DCPN with latency and 43 patients were classified to the p-DCPN cases. The t-DCPN cases showed more dominant female proportion than those of the p-DCPN cases. No p-DCPN patient showed prompt improvement after the 1st canalolith reposition therapy. Among the t-DCPN patients, 18 canal switch cases were found, but, there was no canal switch cases found among the p-DCPN patients. The CRP has showed less effective for the p-DCPN patients and no canal switch patients found in the t-DCPN patients. Null plane direction among p-DCPN patients, didn’t always match the direction of stronger nystagmus during the supine head roll test.
Conclusions
Due to its distinguishing clinical manifestation, p-DCPN may have different pathogenesis and clinical mechanisms from t-DCPN. And the CRP is not an adequate treatment for the p-DCPN patients. Further study with larger number of enrolled subjects is necessary.
Original Article
Dizzy and Psychological Scales in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Suspicious Patients without Characteristic Nystagmus
Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim, Heejin Kim, Seok Jin Hong, Yong Bok Kim, Il-Seok Park, Dawoon Oh
Res Vestib Sci. 2017;16(3):80-84.   Published online September 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2017.16.3.80
  • 9,710 View
  • 143 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Patients, who have had a history of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)-like symptoms, but no characteristic nystagmus, were often present. They are diagnosed as having a resolved state from BPPV or normal, and tend to be overlooked. We investigated the dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, which they had vertigo of a short duration at the specific head position, and clinically suspicious BPPV, but no nystagmus in positional tests, were enrolled. We compared dizzy and psychological scales of suspicious BPPV patients with 138 BPPV patients, using dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), the beck depression inventory (BDI), and the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory. Additionally, among the BPPV-suspicious group, patients with a BPPV history were compared with those with no previous BPPV. Results: No differences in the all scales were found between the two groups. However, DHI scores of patients with a previous BPPV attack were significantly higher than those of patients with no BPPV-like symptoms; in particular, there was a significant difference in emotional scores. Conclusion: Although the patients had no characteristic nystagmus, if they have a BPPV-like history and symptoms, emotional support and periodic follow up are needed. In particular, careful observation should be performed in patients with previous BPPV attack.
1
Dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients without characteristic nystagmus
Seok Min Hong, Sung Kyun Kim, Heejin Kim, Seok Jin Hong, Yong Bok Kim, Il-seok Park, Dawoon Oh
Received July 29, 2017  Accepted August 19, 2017  Published online August 19, 2017  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,527 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
Objectives
Patients, who have had a history of BPPV-like symptoms, but no characteristic nystagmus, were often present. They are diagnosed as having a resolved state from BPPV or normal, and tend to be overlooked. We investigated the dizzy and psychological scales in BPPV-suspicious patients. Study Design : prospective study
Methods
Thirty-nine patients, which they had vertigo of a short duration at the specific head position, and clinically suspicious BPPV, but no nystagmus in positional tests, were enrolled. We compared dizzy and psychological scales of suspicious BPPV patients with 138 BPPV patients, using DHI, BDI and STAI. Additionally, among the BPPV-suspicious group, patients with a BPPV history were compared with those with no previous BPPV.
Results
No differences in the all scales were found between the two groups. However, DHI scores of patients with a previous BPPV attack were significantly higher than those of patients with no BPPV-like symptoms; in particular, there was a significant difference in emotional scores.
Conclusion
Although the patients had no characteristic nystagmus, if they have a BPPV-like history and symptoms, emotional support and periodic follow up are needed. In particular, careful observation should be performed in patients with previous BPPV attack.
Review
Risk of Falls in Dizzy Patients
Sung Kyun Kim, Gi Jung Im
Res Vestib Sci. 2017;16(1):10-16.   Published online March 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2017.16.1.10
  • 14,530 View
  • 257 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Dizziness is the most common symptom in elderly patients and has been identified as a risk factor for falls. They can affect objectively the ability to achieve a stable gaze, posture, and gait. Research on the relationship between vestibular hypofunction and falls in elderly people has been rarely performed and the evidence is controversial. Because falls result from various combinations of many factors, validated tools should be used for assessment of falling. Many of the tests and numerous parameters associated with the risk of falling have already been introduced, however guidance on which test is most appropriate for use in a specific setting still lack in the medical community. Therefore, developement of comprehensive fall risk management guideline and assessment tool including physical, psychosocial, environmental factors are necessary to prevent falls in the elderly. Establishment of validity and reliability for relationship among several vestibular function test are more important to evaluate efficiently risk of falls in the dizzy patients. Also we can expect that decreasing risk of fall when conduct the developement of additional customized intervention method using verified assessment tools.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploratory fall risk and preventive intervention in acute vestibular neuritis
    Euyhyun Park, Sung Kyun Kim, Jinnyeong Jang, Hye Min Han, Jae Jun Song, Sung Won Chae, Hak Hyun Jung, Gi Jung Im
    Journal of International Medical Research.2021; 49(9): 030006052110442.     CrossRef
2s
Risk of Falls in Dizzy Patients
SUNG KYUN KIM, Gi Jung Im
Received January 5, 2017  Accepted February 12, 2017  Published online February 12, 2017  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,453 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
Dizziness is the most common symptom in elderly patients and has been identified as a risk factor for falls. They can affect objectively the ability to achieve a stable gaze, posture, and gait. Research on the relationship between vestibular hypofunction and falls in elderly people has been rarely performed and the evidence is controversial. Because falls result from various combinations of many factors, validated tools should be used for assessment of falling. Many of the tests and numerous parameters associated with the risk of falling have already been introduced, however guidance on which test is most appropriate for use in a specific setting still lack in the medical community. Therefore, developement of comprehensive fall risk management guideline and assessment tool including physical, psychosocial, environmental factors are necessary to prevent falls in the elderly. Establishment of validity and reliability for relationship among several vestibular function test are more important to evaluate efficiently risk of falls in the dizzy patients. Also we can expect that decreasing risk of fall when conduct the developement of additional customized intervention method using verified assessment tools.
Risk of Falls in Dizzy Patients
SUNG KYUN KIM, Gi Jung Im
Received January 5, 2017  Accepted February 12, 2017  Published online February 12, 2017  
   [Accepted]
  • 1,459 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract
Dizziness is the most common symptom in elderly patients and has been identified as a risk factor for falls. They can affect objectively the ability to achieve a stable gaze, posture, and gait. Research on the relationship between vestibular hypofunction and falls in elderly people has been rarely performed and the evidence is controversial. Because falls result from various combinations of many factors, validated tools should be used for assessment of falling. Many of the tests and numerous parameters associated with the risk of falling have already been introduced, however guidance on which test is most appropriate for use in a specific setting still lack in the medical community. Therefore, developement of comprehensive fall risk management guideline and assessment tool including physical, psychosocial, environmental factors are necessary to prevent falls in the elderly. Establishment of validity and reliability for relationship among several vestibular function test are more important to evaluate efficiently risk of falls in the dizzy patients. Also we can expect that decreasing risk of fall when conduct the developement of additional customized intervention method using verified assessment tools.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science